Frequently asked questions – Safia Minney

Safia is often asked MANY questions about why she made the decision to make a career working within, and speaking publicly about fair trade and sustainable fashion, and eradicating modern slavery in the fashion industry. Here’s a few of those questions – and Safia’s thoughts in reply.

Safia MinneySafia Minney, Founder of People Tree, Managing Director of Po-Zu sustainable footwear. Author: Naked Fashion, Slow Fashion and Slave to Fashion.

Speaker agent: Gordon Poole Ltd

1) Safia, what made you decide to make a business from selling ethical and sustainable clothing?

I am simply an ethical consumer. I didn’t want my money to be spent with companies that don’t respect the workers that make their products and the environment. I realised that I would have to design products myself to get products that met high standards. That’s how People Tree started –  we had to construct some of the first Fair Trade and organic supply chains in the world for clothing and foods.

Safia-Minney-Cotton-Farmers

2) How difficult/easy was it to find ethical manufacturers/suppliers?

I asked suppliers and Fair Trade groups how important women’s rights and the environment are to them. I would set up a new product with them, and we would work hard to design, sample and market-test it. Through that process I could see how sincere and capable the suppliers were.

It wasn’t difficult to find groups that share the same values, but helping them make good quality products when they needed help in so many ways: training in the design process and product development, in pattern-cutting and quality control management, and help with production and financial planning as well as  building infrastructure, processes and procuring environmentally friendly materials in rural areas which is very very challenging. Also, you have to sustain orders. It’s a long- term partnership that helps achieve great things, not one-off orders.

3) Why do you think that some people have the impression that ethical and sustainable clothing is expensive?

Because fast fashion doesn’t cover the true costs: The social costs and environmental costs. Also, ethical brands haven’t reached the scale to make distribution costs really cheap because they don’t use slave labour to build up their businesses.

I always wanted ethical fashion to be “democratic” and affordable. People connect directly with the makers of what they consume. We started small-scale. That’s not very cost effective, but we always kept the prices at People Tree affordable and in-line with mid-market brands. So there’s no excuse not to be able to afford fair trade fashion.

Why Po-Zu Footwear shoes are perceived as expensive?

Our ethically and sustainably made Po-Zu shoes come at a cost (when compared with non-ethical mainstream brands) which we think is not just reasonable, but totally justifiable.
For those who are not aware of this issue, we highly recommend watching The True Cost movie which highlights the reason why most clothing items are in fact too cheap. And of course, reading my book Slave To Fashion published by New Internationalist.
Further information concerning ethical issues more specifically to the shoe industry can be found at the Better Shoes Foundation website. @BetterShoes_F on twitter –  http://www.bettershoes.org/

Safia Minney Slave to Fashion

4) How do you keep a good relationship with the suppliers to ensure that the quality of the working environment is up to standard?

We have bi-annual reviews that are monitored by The World Fair Trade Organisation. The Soil Association monitor organic standards for cotton and many of the food farmers. We also visit the groups regularly and work together with them to invest in better buildings, ventilation, water waste management systems and the kind of things that make life healthier where products are produced. We go way down the supply chain too to try to make the best job we can at influencing suppliers to do better. We invest in upgrading skills, and market exposure programmes.

5) Why is hand craftsmanship an important element within People Tree?

It provides more jobs and livelihoods in rural areas for women. That’s the point. Women with families need decent work and a chance to earn whilst looking after their children. People Tree hand knitting, hand weaving, hand embroidery and hand printing provides work for two thirds of the people who make for the company, even though it only accounts for one third of the product sales. I love hand craft skills. They revive traditional skills and celebrate the incredible ancient agriculture and textile heritage of our worlds.

6) Why do you think that most UK high street fashion brands do not follow the same ethics as People Tree?

They are beginning to emulate some aspects. Using organic cotton for example is great. Some progressive brands are starting to look at worker rights through their obligations to eradicate modern slavery.

Some are beginning to phase out the worst types of environmental production techniques.

The problem is that laws need to be properly enforced and business CEOs and Directors held accountable.

7) Why do you think that the general public are only starting to become aware of the severity of modern slavery in garment factories in the last 10 or so years?

I think many of us have been aware for years. Campaigning groups, media makers and ethical fashion brands have done a great job of raising awareness and the government has done little to lead in most countries.

A post shared by Safia Minney (@slavetofash) on

The True Cost movie, Fashion Revolution and many books on the issues have helped get people angry and forcing change. So much is changing now. It’s cool to care. The problem is – is it quick enough and can we change things fast enough? We need collaboration on a huge scale and for business, consumers, govts of every nation and campaigning groups to work to reform business, financial and legislative systems as we know them.

8) Do you feel that UK fast fashion brands use sustainable and ethical fashion as a marketing strategy, therefore not taking these major problems seriously?

I think some are trying hard to revamp their out-dated ways of producing clothes and doing business. I’m hoping that they will share best practice more and more through many new initiatives and through the Ethical Trading Initiative and HULT. We have some very serious problems and very little time to solve them.

I wish that we hadn’t spent 10-20 years with what was generally a load of old ‘greenwash’ wasting time in grappling with the key issues: over production, over consumption, waste and prices so low as to result in a throw away culture that undermines workers’ rights, our planet’s resources and ecosystem and in many cases our physiological well-being.

9) Why do you think that some UK high street fast fashion brands do not take modern slavery in garment factories seriously?

They are beginning to now that the UK Modern Slavery Act requires them to declare what they are doing to eradicate slavery if they are a company of £36million turnover of more. Consumers need to be more demanding and not buy from brands that they don’t trust.

10) What kind of problems do you face when you stock only ethical and sustainable fashion and accessories?

It’s hard work being a 100 percent dedicated ethical fashion company.

You don’t make compromises with workers’ rights or using sustainable materials. In fact you keep setting the bar higher and higher. You try to run faster that the best and set the agenda in your industry. It’s hard, but fun, working with other dedicated change makers – who love design and great products as much as people and our wonderful planet. You have to bring your customers on the journey with you. That’s part of the work that I really enjoy too.

Transcript of interview with Katie Edwards. Summer 2017.

Safia Minney, Founder of People Tree, Managing Director of Po-Zu sustainable footwear. Author: Naked Fashion, Slow Fashion and Slave to Fashion.

Book Safia through her speaker agent: Gordon Poole Ltd

Follow Safia on twitter twitter.com/safiaminney

and Instagram too.

Jaz O’Hara Founder of The Worldwide Tribe in conversation

Safia Minney chats with Jaz O’Hara, founder of theworldwidetribe.com
A humanitarian organisation supporting refugees.

1. You organisation does amazing work on the ground and raising awareness of refugees – how do you split your time? Which has been the most effect campaign to date? (Jaz, love your videos, which is your favourite and why?)

Splitting my time can be tricky; it’s a lot of juggling. In my opinion, raising awareness is so important so I give a lot of talks about the refugee crisis and my experiences in schools and universities… but then I don’t like to be talking about our work on the ground, more than being on the ground. For this reason I try to also spend as much time as possible in camps, meeting people and understating the needs.

logo_theworldwidetribeIn terms of campaigns, our aim is to reach those not already ‘on side.’ The people who don’t already know much about the refugee crisis or support refugees. The people outside of our echo chamber. We do this by tapping into popular culture. For example, in the summer of 2016, when Pokemon Go was sweeping across the world, we took the game to the refugee camp we were working in in Northern France, the Jungle and made a short film. The film had the tag line:

“If Pokemon can cross borders…why can’t a refugee?”

The intention was to reach people engaged with the game and encourage them to start thinking about the crisis we are in the midst of here in Europe. The film was short and shareable, uplifting and positive. We always aim to inspire with our content and never paint anyone out to be a victim, only a hero.

2. Should we be focussing on the causes that force people to flee their homes as well as their resettling – which are the most effective ways of doing this – how can the public support these initiatives? Are there any important pieces of government regulation that need to change to stabilise the home regions and make it possible for people to stay in their homes?

Absolutely I would say it’s super important to look at the cause of these problems and trace them back to the source. If we could avoid there being any refugees in the first place… that would be the best possible solution.

None of these people want to leave their homes so if there would be any way for them to stay, I would always advocate that, but we are not talking about one issue here, we work with people fleeing the world’s worst atrocities… from a genocide in Sudan, to compulsory military service and a totalitarian regime in Eritrea, to the war in Syria. Stabilising these home regions is no easy task and not one we pretend to know how to tackle

What we do know though, is what we have seen and experienced once people leave. The crazy conditions of the camps. The lack of dignity and respect. Right on our doorstep. This is what we can tackle.
We also focus on awareness and education. I believe that changing mindsets and increasing understanding of the situation both in camps and in the home countries of the people we work with, is a huge catalyst towards positive change.

3. How do you keep positive and keep your energy levels up?

Burn out is very real in this industry. People get so emotionally involved in this work that it’s hard to think about anything else, ever. I am guilty of this. But unless you look after yourself, you are useless to anyone else, and this realisation led me to create more balance in my life.

At first it was hard for me to relax and enjoy myself, knowing what I now know and having seen what I had seen. Christmas 2015 was a struggle as many people that I had made very good friends with were suffering in the freezing cold of the Jungle camp in Calais, whilst I was celebrating with my family. It just didn’t seem right. I felt guilty. But I have since learnt to deal with these emotions much better through taking time for things like meditation and yoga…the things I need to keep me going. These things enable me to keep working and I know that the more effective I am, the more impact my work can have on the ground.

4. What drove you to set up your organisation and how can we help support your work?

An update on CalaisThe Worldwide Tribe was born organically from a Facebook post I wrote about my first visit to the Jungle Camp in Calais. It was a personal, raw and emotional post that went viral and sparked a HUGE response. Very soon after I quit my job in ethical fashion to focus 110% on the humanitarian crisis on our doorstep. I just couldn’t think about anything else..!

There are many ways to support our work. You can donate, volunteer or fundraise, but you can also simply read and share our posts. Educating yourself, growing your own understanding and joining the tribe. This is the most important think really. All the details are on our website www.theworldwidetribe.com.

We update our social media daily too so check out our Facebook: www.facebook.com/theworldwidetribe

Instagram: @theworldwidetribe

5. Why is ethical fashion important to you and whose your style icon?

Ethical Fashion has always been important to me. Before setting up the Worldwide Tribe I worked for an Ethical Underwear brand, producing Fair Trade, organic cotton underwear in India. Working closely alongside cotton farmers in rural India, I spent a lot of time really understanding our supply chain. Those three years working between India and London were very insightful, special and transformational for me and brought me to where I am today. Fashion is a huge, powerful industry with the ability to power incredible change. My style icons are still the ladies working in those cotton fields. The way they wear colour brings me so much happiness that I don’t understand why the world doesn’t look to them for inspiration!

To find our more about theworldwidetribe.com click here

Jaz wears: Po-Zu.com ethical sneakers, organic cotton